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saline solution in heated humidifier

Postby Guest on Sat May 06, 2006 5:09 am

First, thanks for the info on AYR saline gell (w/Aloe); was a great relief on my very painful, dry-as-leather nasal passages. Not sure of the cause, but was 3 days ago.

I've been using a Neti pot on&off for 3 weeks, and found it to be an asset to my breathing, due to narrow nasal passages.

I asked my pharmacist if it would be OK to use a saline solution in the water used for the heated humidifier. He said "Definitely". So, I used it last night for the first time, and my nostrils remained clear, and I didn't wake up w/congestion. Even our blood vessels carry the blood in saline, so why not give it what it needs? I'll let you know the results after a week's use, and I expect it to be positive. Offerocker/Kathleen (unable to logon with my Registered name.


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yardbird
 
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Postby yardbird on Sat May 06, 2006 5:15 am

You're going to ruin your humidifier. And possibly damamge your cpap machine. There's a reason the manufacturers all tell you to use distilled water only


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Postby roster on Sat May 06, 2006 8:28 am

I agree with yardbird on the risks of this practice. On the benefits side, I doubt that any of the salt particles can travel to the nostrils in the tiny droplets of water. So you are only getting humidified air just as if you were using distilled water. Maybe a physicist among our forum members can comment on this.


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Postby DME_Guy on Sat May 06, 2006 8:44 am

I had one patient with a Fisher & Paykel heated humidifier years ago. He was using regular tap water and it ate through the bottom of the container and ruined his antique nightstand which was part of a set. I called Fisher & Paykel and was told if he didn't use didtilled water they're not at fault.

You may damage your hose, mask, CPAP, and humidifier.


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Wulfman
 
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Postby Wulfman on Sat May 06, 2006 9:52 am

yardbird wrote:You're going to ruin your humidifier. And possibly damamge your cpap machine. There's a reason the manufacturers all tell you to use distilled water only



DITTO!!!

Den

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Postby 3isles on Sat May 06, 2006 10:48 am

When my daughter was a baby they still made those heavy duty vaporizers that made hot steam. The directions said that if it didn't steam enough to put in a pinch of salt. It made plenty of steam after that by gum, peeled the paper right off her walls.

The saline might be really great for your nose, and I am sure its not unhealthy for you. But its probably not healthy for the humidifier. Its really a bummer. You'll have to decide if you want to risk the life of your humidifier for this new found comfort. It might last or it might die from it. Maybe if they covered the heating element in ceramic or something it could heat the saline without reacting with it??? just wondering (babbling...)

Hope you can find a way to keep both your comfort and your humidifier

Cathy

On cpap May 2005 pressure 13
on bipap February 2008
current machine: Resp BiPap Auto/Biflex
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Postby Snoozin' Bluezzz on Sat May 06, 2006 10:55 am

DME_Guy wrote:...He was using regular tap water and it ate through the bottom of the container and ruined his antique nightstand which was part of a set.


Something else may have failed with his machine but, I'm sorry, but tap water eating through a humidifer makes absolutely no sense. There is nothing in tap water than can "eat" through anything that I know of except perhaps iron/steel as rust over a very long time I suppose.
Last edited by Snoozin' Bluezzz on Sat May 06, 2006 12:55 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Postby roztom on Sat May 06, 2006 11:48 am

Depending on the part of the country you're in will determine the hardness or softness of the water. If your water is hard - full of minerals then you will not be doing your humidifier any favors. Also, tap water has chlorine and a bunch of sediment and crud. Your xPAP machine needs distilled water. Just like your car you don't put tap water in the radiator - you should not put tap into your xPAP unless you have to on a trip or something but as regular practice best not to fool with mother nature.

Distilled water is about $1.25 or so a gallon - I go thru a gallon every 2 weeks.

Tom

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Postby Use Common Sense!!! on Sat May 06, 2006 12:31 pm

Ask yourself this: Do I want saline in my lungs? People sometimes forget what you breathe may be benificial to your nose but NEVER, EVER forget it is also going into your lungs!!!

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Postby Snoozin' Bluezzz on Sat May 06, 2006 12:49 pm

I just want to be clear that in my comment I was not advocating tap water in the humidifier. I do not think it is a good practice and would recommend bottled water, i.e. while traveling, where it might not be easy to get distilled or practical to lug it around.

I was responding the the idea that tap water could "eat" through the humidifier. I don't want to be mean to DME_guy but that is just plain silly. If the night stand ruination did occur something else was its cause, not tap water in the humidifier.

Use Common Sense!!! wrote:Ask yourself this: Do I want saline in my lungs? People sometimes forget what you breathe may be benificial to your nose but NEVER, EVER forget it is also going into your lungs!!!


Does anybody on this forum live by the coast? Go to the beach? Just curious about salt water and air. Seems about the same relationship to me.


SB



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Postby 3isles on Sat May 06, 2006 3:18 pm

Usecommonsense -
what do you think they use in nebs?

and check out this link

Studies look to sea for cystic fibrosis treatment:
http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/conditions/01/18/cf.saltwater/index.html

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Postby Guest on Sat May 06, 2006 3:34 pm

Don't be confused by thinking the stuff approved for use in a room vaporizer or a room humidifier or a nebulizer (nebs don't use heat, BTW) is also approved for mainlining right into your lungs from your cpap's heated humidifier.

Adding any agent to the heated humidifier of your cpap machine besides distilled water is likely to crack/cloud the tank.

I've not yet heard of any doctor who okayed the use of anything besides distilled water in the heated humidifier OF A CPAP.


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Postby Guest on Sat May 06, 2006 3:48 pm

3isles wrote:Studies look to sea for cystic fibrosis treatment:
http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/conditions/01/18/cf.saltwater/index.html


Per the study, inhaling a saline solution increases water production in your lungs.
If I had cystic fibrosis, my lungs were unable to clear mucous, and I needed to promote lung lubrication, I'd try it. But my lungs are normal and do not require being tricked into producing more water by inhaling a 7% saline solution.

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Postby Guest on Sat May 06, 2006 3:59 pm

Saline solution has the PH that resembles that of eye tears, don't think it is enough to really hurt anything, but it does contain salt which could build up on your humidifier due to the heat plate.

I would not use saline solution in the humidifier, use it in your neti pot to decongest and flush out your nasal cavity, but use distilled if you want your humidifer to last longer.


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saline

Postby tomjax on Sat May 06, 2006 4:50 pm

The only thing that will happen when salt is added to HH is that it will remain behind when the water evaporates.
None will enter the lungs the way saline nasal sparay will.

You willl inhale water vaper ONLY.

The pinch of salt in a steam vaporizer is necessary to conduct electricity and thereby heat the water.

Distilled water will not conduct electricity.

Lots of innacurate and misleading postings here.

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