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General Discussion on any topic relating to CPAP and/or Sleep Apnea.
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jilliansue
 
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CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby jilliansue on Mon Apr 18, 2011 6:16 pm

Hello! I just had an upper molar extracted this afternoon. The dentist said the tooth was very close to the sinus and I should avoid blowing my nose vigorously. So I asked him about the cpap therapy and he asked if I could turn down the pressure, as that would probably be better than not using it. I can turn the pressure down. I am wondering if a very low pressure will really be any better than no CPAP at all.

Does anyone have any experience with this?

Thank you,
Jill

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BleepingBeauty
 
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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby BleepingBeauty on Mon Apr 18, 2011 6:34 pm

jilliansue wrote:Hello! I just had an upper molar extracted this afternoon. The dentist said the tooth was very close to the sinus and I should avoid blowing my nose vigorously. So I asked him about the cpap therapy and he asked if I could turn down the pressure, as that would probably be better than not using it. I can turn the pressure down. I am wondering if a very low pressure will really be any better than no CPAP at all.

Does anyone have any experience with this?

Thank you,
Jill


If it was me, I'd try sleeping at my normal pressure. If that caused discomfort, I'd try lowering the pressure by 1 or 2 cms and see if that was ok. If not, then lower it by another 1 or 2 cms, etc. Anything less than your optimal pressure will mean less effective therapy, but it's a temporary situation. Just do the best you can.

I hope you don't have too much trouble. Good luck. :D
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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby cflame1 on Mon Apr 18, 2011 6:36 pm

I've had one pulled while on XPAP... just make sure that your mask strap doesn't hit your cheek where the tooth was pulled... if it does... it'll hurt!

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby jilliansue on Mon Apr 18, 2011 6:52 pm

Thank you!!! His concern was that the membrane between the sinuses and where the tooth was taken out was thin and I think he was concerned about leakage of air into the sinus...

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby BleepingBeauty on Mon Apr 18, 2011 6:55 pm

jilliansue wrote:Thank you!!! His concern was that the membrane between the sinuses and where the tooth was taken out was thin and I think he was concerned about leakage of air into the sinus...


If you find you just can't use the machine for a night or two, do what you can to mitigate the apnea with your position. Sleep on your tummy if you can, or your sides. Prop yourself more upright (lots of pillows) or sleep in a recliner, if possible. I hope it goes well. :)
Veni, vidi, Velcro. I came, I saw, I stuck around.

Dx 11/07: AHI 107, central apnea, Cheyne Stokes respiration, moderate-severe O2 desats. (Simple OSA would be too easy. ;))

PR S1 ASV 950, Hybrid mask, F&P 150 humidifier, O2 @ 2L.

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jilliansue
 
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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby jilliansue on Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:01 pm

Thanks. Those are the things that I was thinking of doing.....I apprecite the input

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby purple on Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:07 pm

I would not ignore the dentists advice. I personally was hit in the face and sometimes when I blow my nose, I have air come out the corner of my eye. The deeper problem is that Sinuses have bacteria and collect debris, including pollen. My eyes are constantly red, which is not good for them, and I look like something out of nightmare. Some bacteria are nearly impossible to kill in the sinuses from any antibiotics.

Having a break in the sinus membrane could be a big problem for the rest of your life. If you use a nasal mask, I might not use the sleep apnea machine at all, because it would put a lot of pressure from the inside of your sinus outward to were the tooth is.

We are all kind of guessing here. My point is that the consequences from breaking the membrane may be for the rest of your life, or at least a surgery to fix it. I can not afford to get mine fixed.

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archangle
 
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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby archangle on Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:45 pm

Talk to your dentist.

If you tape your mouth shut, it would seem that the pressure in your mouth should be the same as the pressure in your nose. Wouldn't the sinuses be at the same pressure as your nose, so if the pressure in your nose is the same as the pressure in your mouth, there's no pressure difference? Wouldn't this reduce any risk of blowing a hole from the tooth socket to your sinus?

A CPAP pressure of 20 cmH2O is a rather high CPAP pressure, but it's only 0.3 PSI. It would seem that just normal breathing, drinking through a straw, talking, coughing, sneezing, whatever might well be higher.

If you were drinking water from an 8 inch long straw, that will give you 20 cmH20 of vacuum. It really doesn't seem like that much pressure. Or if you had a mouthfull of water, put an 8 inch straw in your mouth and blew the water straight up into the air, just dribbling out the end, that's 20 cmH2O as well.

Or for that matter, put on your CPAP machine. Purse your lips and let a small stream of air blow out your lips. That's how much pressure. Or simply keep your lips together and feel how much pressure there is on the inside of your mouth. Move your lips like you're making a "Pa" sound while using your CPAP and feel how much pressure there is. Then make the "Pa" sound while not wearing the CPAP and talking normally. I suspect you'll be making as much pressure while talking as while CPAPing. Close your mouth and breathe sharply out your nose. Feel the pressure of that vs. CPAP pressure.

Like I say, consult with your dentist, but I don't think CPAP pressure is going to be high enough to make more sinus damage possibility than normal daily activities such as eating, drinking, talking, breathing, etc.

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby Slinky on Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:52 pm

Molar extractions are more prone to "dry sockets" than our more forward teeth. IF you've ever had a dry socket (I've had two) you wouldn't even consider using your PAP for 2-3 nights.

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby NightMonkey on Mon Apr 18, 2011 8:48 pm

cflame1 wrote:I've had one pulled while on XPAP...



Did the dentist complain about the vent air blowing in his face?
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jilliansue
 
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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby jilliansue on Tue Apr 19, 2011 11:26 am

Thank you for the resonses! I did sleep without my BiPap machine last night, and will probably do so for another couple of nights. I did not realize that the PAP might make it more prone to a dry socket!

I am glad I have all of you to help me think about things that had not occured to me!

Jill

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby roster on Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:06 pm

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dry-so ... prevention

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby Breathe Jimbo on Tue Apr 19, 2011 4:50 pm

The pressure from blowing your nose is probably 100 times more than even the highest xPAP setting.

Remember that the mouth heals more quickly than other parts of the body.

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby cflame1 on Tue Apr 19, 2011 4:53 pm

NightMonkey wrote:
cflame1 wrote:I've had one pulled while on XPAP...



Did the dentist complain about the vent air blowing in his face?

:P

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Re: CPAP after tooth extraction

Postby jilliansue on Tue Apr 19, 2011 5:02 pm

He told me not to blow my nose the first day, and not to blow it vigorously for a couple days after that. I think I will not blow my nose, not use any nose spray, and not use my CPAP for 2 more nights.

Thanks again!!
Jill

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