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General Discussion on any topic relating to CPAP and/or Sleep Apnea.
meister
 
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Who knows CO2 blood levels?

Postby meister on Mon Oct 24, 2005 3:09 pm

In my last blood test, my CO2 was flagged as high at 33 MMOL/L. Anyone
have a similar problem, or know anything about high blood CO2 levels?

barbyann
 
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CO2

Postby barbyann on Mon Oct 24, 2005 5:51 pm

I am assuming this was a venous blood test, right? normal values 23-30 mmol/L

some drugs can cause increased levels. Are you on Aldosterone, barbiturates, bicarbonates, hydrocortisone, diuretics or steroids? If so it may be the cause.

Are you sick? Increased levels may signal the following:
severe diarrhea, starvation, severe vomiting, Aldosteronism, Emphysema, hyperventilation syndrome.

You are obviously retaining CO2 for some reason. More importantly, what did your doctor say?

meister
 
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Postby meister on Mon Oct 24, 2005 7:52 pm

I am on diuretics. Thanks. Doctor said "I don't like patients
who ask a lot of questions. Just do what I say!" :(

I don't have any of those things which you listed. I just have
severe Central Sleep Apnea. I tend to forget to breathe.

IllinoisRRT
 
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Postby IllinoisRRT on Mon Oct 24, 2005 7:59 pm

Could you clarify what kind of test this was? An ABG, or VBG? Most commonly results are given in mmHg (millimeters of mercury), and the normal CO2 level is 35-45 mmHg
Christine RRT

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deltadave
 
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Elevated CO2 Levels

Postby deltadave on Tue Oct 25, 2005 5:27 am

My guess in the pool would be contraction alkalosis. Make sure your other electrolyte levels are OK.

My response to the MD would be "I don't like doctors who don't have a lot of answers."

deltadave

Im2tired
 
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Postby Im2tired on Tue Oct 25, 2005 10:29 am

This is good timing since I just got a copy of my blood work and my CO2 was 32 (Lab reference range 22 - 31 MMOL/L) and I was wondering about it. I am on steroids (Prednisone) for rheumatoid arthritis along with other medications for the RA, diabetes, hypothroid and allergies. I get blood drawn every 6 weeks.

If you have sleep apnea isn't it true you don't have as much oxygen and have more CO2? Would it show up in your blood?

I went to an alternative heath care provider before being dx'd with sleep apnea and she hooked wires to my head and said that I had CO2 poisoning at one time. My goal with seeing this person was to have someone give me some advise about supplements to help with my digestive problems and I don't believe there is any medical evidence that the tests that she ran are reliable but I was wondering after the sleep apnea was dx'd if there was a connection with the high CO2. Mainly I was thinking if there was a better way to identify people who could have sleep apnea and should have a sleep study. She also said I suffered from extreme fatigue and lack of relaxation but of course who doesn't these days?
Laurie

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deltadave
 
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CO2 Levels

Postby deltadave on Tue Oct 25, 2005 8:33 pm

The CO2 level you're refering to is the total CO2, composed of the serum bicarbonate (about 95% of the total) and dissolved CO2. So this cannot be necessarily used interchangeably with the pCO2 level, a gas pressure as described above, that is determined either by blood gas or end tidal CO2 measurement.
Total CO2 is used to assess metabolic status, while pCO2 and ETCO2 are used to determine ventilatory status, which is what we're more interested in when we talk about sleep apnea.
The problems of gas exchange in sleep apnea occur only while you sleep, so even if your pCO2 is elevated during the night (and a sign of that could be morning headache) it normalizes during the day, so this wouldn't be a good measure of sleep apnea. Or rather, by the time you were having chronically elevated pCO2 levels, you'd be in a heap o' trouble (like the Pickwickian syndrome). Also as noted above, elevated Total CO2 has a variety of causes, so this is really something you should be reviewing with your physician.
Im2tired, you probably had carbon monoxide poisoning (CO) rather than dioxide (CO2). CO is the one from exhaust fumes, faulty furnaces, etc.
deltadave
Last edited by deltadave on Wed Oct 26, 2005 4:50 am, edited 2 times in total.

barbyann
 
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meister

Postby barbyann on Tue Oct 25, 2005 8:40 pm

Since diuretics have the known side effect of increasing CO2 in blood may I suggest that you speak with your pharmacist about this side effect? He/She may be more willing to explain the cause. They may also be willing to act as a liaison with your doctor. My pharmacist is brilliant and has become my friend and best resource over the past few years.


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