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General Discussion on any topic relating to CPAP and/or Sleep Apnea.
jda1000
 
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SPO2 Levels

Postby jda1000 on Wed Feb 25, 2009 5:51 pm

I've obtained a recording oximeter, which works well.

But I've had bad Google-luck trying to determine what a proper SPO2 level is while sleeping. Awake, it appears to be nearly always above about 95%; asleep, it runs more in the 93-95% range. I can't even find whether that is normal. I don't think it's considered risky, but I'm still curious.

Also was wondering if there is any way to tell what stage of sleep I'm in from the graphs of SPO2 and pulse rate. Haven't had much Google-luck on "spo2 REM," either.

Thanks!
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Gale Hawkins
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby Gale Hawkins on Wed Feb 25, 2009 5:56 pm

I am getting ready to order one and have the question.

That Sleep Tech
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby That Sleep Tech on Wed Feb 25, 2009 6:41 pm

Whats a normal SPO2? That depends on the individual. That being said a healthy, non smoker can be around 98% give or take. If you have a cold or bronchitis then your lung efficiency will be down, resulting in a lower SPO2. During REM your body slows down your heart rate and your SPO2 goes down. This is normal. As far as determining where and when you have REM through out the night it can be difficult if not impossible using only your SPO2 reading and your CPAP. Normal sleep goes as follows Stage 1-2-3-4-3-2-REM. The AASM has recently done away with stage 4 and coupled it with stage 3 so it looks more like 1-2-3-2-REM. A normal sleep cycle is about 120min. So without and EEG to confirm, a lower SPO2 and a lower heart rate coupled with the ability to remember a dream might, maybe allow you to start guessing when you had REM. Also if you awaken form a dream state and have the ability to go back to sleep after awakening sometimes you'll drop back into REM almost right away (REM rebound). Really the only definitive way would be to have and EEG or someone to look or video tape your eyes at night with a timestamp on the tape to know when REM occurred. That being said there is also tonic/non-phasic and phasic REM. Phasic REM is "normal" REM ie. rapid eye movement, tonic or non-phasic REM is a REM state without eye movements. So really the only 100% definitive way of knowing when REM occur is with and EEG. That being said, if you remember you dreams you had REM sleep at some point during the night. Sorry that kinda got a little long winded and convoluted towards the end.

Gale Hawkins
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby Gale Hawkins on Wed Feb 25, 2009 6:58 pm

Desaturation Event: drop in SpO2 by at least 4% for a minimum duration of 10 seconds.
Pulse Event: Change in rate by at least 6 bpm for a minimum duration of 8 seconds.

Source http://www.echostore.com/wireless-oximeter-cms50e.html

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jnk
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby jnk on Wed Feb 25, 2009 7:24 pm

jda1000 wrote:. . . bad Google-luck trying to determine what a proper SPO2 level is while sleeping. Awake, it appears to be nearly always above about 95%; asleep, it runs more in the 93-95% range. I can't even find whether that is normal. . . .


I am having a hard time finding a reference explaining what normal spO2 is too. But I believe, from memory, that anything above 95% is considered within normal range. Consistently below 93% will start to raise eyebrows. Below 90% is not good. And a drop of 4 points from a person's baseline can be considered a desaturation. That's only what I remember reading somewhere. It irritates me that I can't find it now. I'm slipping.
"All quotes are actually misquotes."-- Never directly attributed to Bartlett.

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TSSleepy
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby TSSleepy on Wed Feb 25, 2009 7:27 pm

The one I've seen most is 4% desaturation, but 2% and 3% are somtimes used as well. In fact, in some literature they will talk about an ODI4 (oxygen desaturation index 4%). It seems like the SPO PulseOx 7500 calculates an ODI based on 3% desaturations.

The other benchmark I hear is going below 90%.


This thread shows some of my recordings, if you're interested.

http://www.cpaptalk.com/viewtopic/t39171/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=39022&p=341288#p341288

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jnk
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby jnk on Wed Feb 25, 2009 7:49 pm

"All quotes are actually misquotes."-- Never directly attributed to Bartlett.

jda1000
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby jda1000 on Wed Feb 25, 2009 10:39 pm

Thanks - I found the post about REM cycles interesting, not long-winded...seems like it'd be tough to videotape my own eyes while asleep, but with the right gear...

Don't think I'll be getting an EEG anytime soon, but I wonder if anyone makes a sort of mask devise that can monitor eye motion.
Machine: Resmed Autoset II
Humidifier: Resmed H4i
Mask: Mirage Ultra

Gale Hawkins
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby Gale Hawkins on Mon Mar 02, 2009 12:49 pm

http://www.facelake.com/cms50e.html

UPS just brought it and I have it on the charger and have installed the software. I will wear it after lunch and see how easy it is to suck the data into the software. Software looks cool from the screen. The color display on the meter is neat as well. Later

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Gerald
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby Gerald on Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:06 pm

Jda.....

If you're holding 93-95% saturation while asleep, I don't think you should be concerned. I become mildly concerned when mine runs 90-92%....and when it drops to 89% or less, I want to know "why".

I think you're doing just fine.

Gerald

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cpapsue
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby cpapsue on Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:57 pm

I'm seeing the Dr tomorrow morning to specifically talk about oxygen requirements and levels while sleeping. I'll post tomorrow after the appt. Hopefully, he will have some specific information!

My oxygen drops into the 80's frequently according to my SPO 7500, that's what got my attention and why I'm seeing him.

tammi.dowling
 

Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby tammi.dowling on Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:24 am

Just to reassure you that those readings while sleeping are fine. Nothing to worry about.[/quote] I am refering to the person who wrote their spo2 was 93-95%.

pbriggs
 
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Re: SPO2 Levels

Postby pbriggs on Mon Feb 17, 2014 3:40 pm

to me, SPO2 readings in the 90's is "normal" for most people and nothing to be concerned about. My average is 93-95 most of the time - awake, sleeping, pretty much all the time. I am in good health and decent shape. My father-in-law when I tested him was in the 98-99 all the time that he was just sitting around. He is in very poor health and very overweight and has much difficulty breathing. So,,. normal for one is not normal for another.

When to be concerned - typically an insurance company is willing to pay for O2 when you have SPO2 readings below 88% for greater than 5 minutes if my memory serves me.

In my original sleep study my numbers were in the low 80's most of the night. With treatment with the BiPAP I am in the mid 90's all the time.

Home this helps some

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