adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

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palerider
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by palerider » Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:37 pm

USMCVet wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 2:50 pm
20 cm h20 equals 0.2844 PSI.

So 8 inches of h20 equals 0.2887 .
*lols*

I'll simplify your conversion...

20cm = 7.87402 inches.
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by palerider » Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:41 pm

TedVPAP wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:00 pm
If I understand what some are talking about, it seems like some people want a larger water reservoir so that they don't have to fill-up so often. To do this all that is needed is a sealable reservoir that can handle low pressure (e.g., plastic soda bottle), two pieces of tubing, and four tube fittings.

Attach the tube fittings towards the top (above the water line) and the bottom of the existing humidifier reservoir and the supplemental reservoir - the fittings can not leak so use silicone. Join the two reservoir with the tubing. The top tubing will ensure air pressure in both tanks are the same so the water level will also be the same.
Congratulations, you just repeated what I mentioned 14 messages before.

Well done.
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by USMCVet » Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:56 pm

palerider wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:41 pm
TedVPAP wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:00 pm
If I understand what some are talking about, it seems like some people want a larger water reservoir so that they don't have to fill-up so often. To do this all that is needed is a sealable reservoir that can handle low pressure (e.g., plastic soda bottle), two pieces of tubing, and four tube fittings.

Attach the tube fittings towards the top (above the water line) and the bottom of the existing humidifier reservoir and the supplemental reservoir - the fittings can not leak so use silicone. Join the two reservoir with the tubing. The top tubing will ensure air pressure in both tanks are the same so the water level will also be the same.
Congratulations, you just repeated what I mentioned 14 messages before.

Well done.
So are you still saying that with a supplemental water reservoir elevated at least 8 inches above APAP would not be able to overcome the pressure changes of an APAP?

I don't understand why you say this won't work? What reliability issues would there be?

Also you admit there is maybe a small group of people this would benefit so maybe there isn't a product out there because demand is so small

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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by palerider » Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:04 pm

USMCVet wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:56 pm
palerider wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:41 pm
TedVPAP wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:00 pm
If I understand what some are talking about, it seems like some people want a larger water reservoir so that they don't have to fill-up so often. To do this all that is needed is a sealable reservoir that can handle low pressure (e.g., plastic soda bottle), two pieces of tubing, and four tube fittings.

Attach the tube fittings towards the top (above the water line) and the bottom of the existing humidifier reservoir and the supplemental reservoir - the fittings can not leak so use silicone. Join the two reservoir with the tubing. The top tubing will ensure air pressure in both tanks are the same so the water level will also be the same.
Congratulations, you just repeated what I mentioned 14 messages before.

Well done.
So are you still saying that with a supplemental water reservoir elevated at least 8 inches above APAP would not be able to overcome the pressure changes of an APAP?

I don't understand why you say this won't work? What reliability issues would there be?

Also you admit there is maybe a small group of people this would benefit so maybe there isn't a product out there because demand is so small
None of what you've said here makes any sense in relation to what you've quoted.

I'm waiting on your prototype.
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by Goofproof » Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:14 pm

Another BIG problem, how could anyone who couldn't adjust the temp of the HH down, and fill the HH Full, truly be able to make a adaption work.... Simple Verse more complex. Jim

Just because the HH knob can go Wide Open Throttle or Auto doesn't mean it has to go that high. :roll: Jim
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by USMCVet » Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:21 pm

palerider wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:04 pm
USMCVet wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:56 pm
palerider wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:41 pm
TedVPAP wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:00 pm
If I understand what some are talking about, it seems like some people want a larger water reservoir so that they don't have to fill-up so often. To do this all that is needed is a sealable reservoir that can handle low pressure (e.g., plastic soda bottle), two pieces of tubing, and four tube fittings.

Attach the tube fittings towards the top (above the water line) and the bottom of the existing humidifier reservoir and the supplemental reservoir - the fittings can not leak so use silicone. Join the two reservoir with the tubing. The top tubing will ensure air pressure in both tanks are the same so the water level will also be the same.
Congratulations, you just repeated what I mentioned 14 messages before.

Well done.
So are you still saying that with a supplemental water reservoir elevated at least 8 inches above APAP would not be able to overcome the pressure changes of an APAP?

I don't understand why you say this won't work? What reliability issues would there be?

Also you admit there is maybe a small group of people this would benefit so maybe there isn't a product out there because demand is so small
None of what you've said here makes any sense in relation to what you've quoted.

I'm waiting on your prototype.

Answer this for me then.

What will constitute success or failure to you? I want to make sure I know so when I do a prototype you don't back peddle.

If you can't define what a success or failure would be then it's obvious you will never admit to being wrong if you are.

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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by palerider » Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:34 pm

USMCVet wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 4:21 pm
What will constitute success or failure to you? I want to make sure I know so when I do a prototype you don't back peddle.

If you can't define what a success or failure would be then it's obvious you will never admit to being wrong if you are.
What matters is whether or not it works, not whether I think it does or not, or whether I admit to anything.

Does it reliably keep the tank from running out of water as fast?

I never said it can't be done, I said it's not as simple as you seem to think it is.
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by chunkyfrog » Sun Feb 25, 2018 6:42 pm

Tank capacity is designed to last for eight hours, more or less.
There is only one way to prevent excess water escaping through mouth.
SHUT IT.

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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by NucEng » Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:51 pm

OK. This thread is driving me crazy. LOL. The design is really straightforward and trivial. You put a reservoir of water (any height) next to the humidifier. Run a small hose with an in-line one way check valve and a tiny electric pump ( battery powered if you like) from your reservoir into the bottom of the humidifier. Then you put a tiny float sensor switch on the top of the humidifier. The switch is slaved to the inline pump. When the reservoir water falls below your predetermined threshold, the pump turns on forcing water through the one way check valve and refills your humidifier. When the humidifier is full the float switch shuts off the pump. There. We are done. By the way. I am an engineer.

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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by lilly747 » Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:05 pm

NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:51 pm
OK. This thread is driving me crazy. LOL.
lol...so is this what it took to get you to register? Welcome and duck........ :roll:

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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by Goofproof » Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:18 pm

NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:51 pm
OK. This thread is driving me crazy. LOL. The design is really straightforward and trivial. You put a reservoir of water (any height) next to the humidifier. Run a small hose with an in-line one way check valve and a tiny electric pump ( battery powered if you like) from your reservoir into the bottom of the humidifier. Then you put a tiny float sensor switch on the top of the humidifier. The switch is slaved to the inline pump. When the reservoir water falls below your predetermined threshold, the pump turns on forcing water through the one way check valve and refills your humidifier. When the humidifier is full the float switch shuts off the pump. There. We are done. By the way. I am an engineer.
I think we had a engineer here once, he got the heave ho! That seems like a lot work to go to for someone that can't fill a HH when it goes low. Why not just use your Robot to fill it for you. :lol: Jim

Put the water in a bag on a IV stand, no need for the pump, only thing to fail is the float valve and hoses. K.I.S.S.!
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by NucEng » Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:34 pm

Goofproof wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:18 pm
NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:51 pm
OK. This thread is driving me crazy. LOL. The design is really straightforward and trivial. You put a reservoir of water (any height) next to the humidifier. Run a small hose with an in-line one way check valve and a tiny electric pump ( battery powered if you like) from your reservoir into the bottom of the humidifier. Then you put a tiny float sensor switch on the top of the humidifier. The switch is slaved to the inline pump. When the reservoir water falls below your predetermined threshold, the pump turns on forcing water through the one way check valve and refills your humidifier. When the humidifier is full the float switch shuts off the pump. There. We are done. By the way. I am an engineer.
I think we had a engineer here once, he got the heave ho! That seems like a lot work to go to for someone that can't fill a HH when it goes low. Why not just use your Robot to fill it for you. :lol: Jim

Put the water in a bag on a IV stand, no need for the pump, only thing to fail is the float valve and hoses. K.I.S.S.!
Haaaaaaaa. I like the IV bag !!! That would save the cost of a $2 pump. The funny thing is that I’m one of the few that actually does run out of water by early morning. I need maximum humidity for comfort and sometimes I sleep 9 or 10 hours. The damn Dreamstation HH has a small capacity. It’s a lousy design. My old Resmed S9 had a larger capacity HH and I never ran out. I would actually buy a system to auto fill for me if it were reasonably priced. I’m guessing the CPAP manufactures don’t sell them because the water would become unsanitary. If the reservoir held let’s say 1/2 gallon, then it might take a week, maybe more to run dry. By then you may have mold and or bacteria growing in the HH. The HH really should be emptied and dried out daily to prevent contamination.

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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by lilly747 » Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:44 pm

NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:34 pm
Goofproof wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:18 pm
NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:51 pm
OK. This thread is driving me crazy. LOL. The design is really straightforward and trivial. You put a reservoir of water (any height) next to the humidifier. Run a small hose with an in-line one way check valve and a tiny electric pump ( battery powered if you like) from your reservoir into the bottom of the humidifier. Then you put a tiny float sensor switch on the top of the humidifier. The switch is slaved to the inline pump. When the reservoir water falls below your predetermined threshold, the pump turns on forcing water through the one way check valve and refills your humidifier. When the humidifier is full the float switch shuts off the pump. There. We are done. By the way. I am an engineer.
I think we had a engineer here once, he got the heave ho! That seems like a lot work to go to for someone that can't fill a HH when it goes low. Why not just use your Robot to fill it for you. :lol: Jim

Put the water in a bag on a IV stand, no need for the pump, only thing to fail is the float valve and hoses. K.I.S.S.!
Haaaaaaaa. I like the IV bag !!! That would save the cost of a $2 pump. The funny thing is that I’m one of the few that actually does run out of water by early morning. I need maximum humidity for comfort and sometimes I sleep 9 or 10 hours. The damn Dreamstation HH has a small capacity. It’s a lousy design. My old Resmed S9 had a larger capacity HH and I never ran out. I would actually buy a system to auto fill for me if it were reasonably priced. I’m guessing the CPAP manufactures don’t sell them because the water would become unsanitary. If the reservoir held let’s say 1/2 gallon, then it might take a week, maybe more to run dry. By then you may have mold and or bacteria growing in the HH. The HH really should be emptied and dried out daily to prevent contamination.
+1 it is a lousy design.....the s9 vpap did not run dry either. I fixed my problem by turning down the HH to 3.

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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by palerider » Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:49 pm

NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:34 pm

Then you put a tiny float sensor switch... We are done. By the way. I am an engineer.
Until the float valve gummed up due to hard to clean bacterial growth, or mineral deposits.
NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:51 pm
By then you may have mold and or bacteria growing in the HH. The HH really should be emptied and dried out daily to prevent contamination.
Eh, not really:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3716664/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16236866
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Re: adding water detection to future cpap/bi-pap machines

Post by Goofproof » Fri Mar 02, 2018 8:03 pm

palerider wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:49 pm
NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 7:34 pm

Then you put a tiny float sensor switch... We are done. By the way. I am an engineer.
Until the float valve gummed up due to hard to clean bacterial growth, or mineral deposits.
NucEng wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 6:51 pm
By then you may have mold and or bacteria growing in the HH. The HH really should be emptied and dried out daily to prevent contamination.
Eh, not really:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3716664/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16236866
Or the ten for a yen, rubber valves failed. :lol: Jim
Use data to optimize your xPAP treatment:
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