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Boiling Stuff Part 2

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Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by chunkyfrog on Thu Aug 11, 2016 4:39 pm

" . . . Love is like oxygen . . . "

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by palerider on Thu Aug 11, 2016 4:04 pm

Julie wrote:How could 02 not be a 'friend' of silicone when it's the standard material used in Cpaps delivering 02 to people?

Really having to restrain myself on this one!

oxygen isn't a friend of many things. it's an uneasy ally at best, oxygen and iron? rust. oxygen and oil, fire. too much oxygen and you, bad things up to death.

that said, Oxygen, or even ozone, is rated 'excellent' in compatibility with silicone.

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by chunkyfrog on Thu Aug 11, 2016 9:50 am

Ah, Julie. I missed the oxygen bit.
Now I have to wipe snot off my tablet. :mrgreen:

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by Julie on Thu Aug 11, 2016 9:40 am

How could 02 not be a 'friend' of silicone when it's the standard material used in Cpaps delivering 02 to people?

Really having to restrain myself on this one!

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by chunkyfrog on Thu Aug 11, 2016 9:37 am

The cushions and pillows that are 100% silicone can be boiled.
Most of the newer designs are composited with low temperature plastic.
I suspect that "someone" in product development has been lurking the forum.
Too bad they only use the knowledge to mess with us! :twisted:

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by LSAT on Thu Aug 11, 2016 8:40 am

I've been doing this for 2 years...every 4-6 months with my Quattro silicone. I boil the water with a tsp baking soda..let the silicone soak for 2-3 minutes and rinse. Silicone looks like new. I use my silicone cushions for 12-15 months and then replace..(even though I could probably use them longer).

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by InsomniacGuy on Thu Aug 11, 2016 8:00 am

After reading this helpful thread, I dunked and swished my Quattro Air cushion into a shallow layer of sub-boiling distilled water/baking soda solution because the package notes that the temperature rating is below 80 C. Also rinsed with distilled water.

That did seem to refresh the silicone, but possibly this caused the silicone to detach from the plastic along one side soon after... Probably should have acquired another cushion before I attempted this maneuver.

Ah well. It was worth a go. I'm only on 20 months on the equipment. It seems other folks have managed to get their gear to last longer....?

Also, I thought I could extend the life of the gear by storing everything in the original packaging and squeezing out the air while not in use -- assumed that oxygen is not the friend of silicone and the headgear...

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by nanwilson on Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:23 am

archangle wrote:
hiroto437 wrote:Hi,
Thank you. I will try to boil my Swift FX Nasal pillow.
Thank you


I

Someone posted that P10 cushions melt if boiled.

Some hoses, especially clear plastic "short" hose as part of masks may be damaged. Normal hoses seem to get "crinkly," but don't completely melt.

Of course, don't do the boiling step on anything you can't stand to lose. Even if one person got away with "boiling" a particular CPAP part doesn't mean they haven't changed the design and your part may melt. Or that your part may crack or something.

There are some ResMed and Respironics sanitation guides in the Useful Links in my signature line at the bottom of this post.



Re P10 pillows.... they go into boiling water just fine... did one set on Friday, no problem. I put my 2 cups water in the micro until it boils, take it out add my teaspoon of baking soda, give it a stir and add the P10 pillow, left it for 5 or 10 minutes and took it out. Rinsed it with distilled water, let it dry and popped it back into my mask.
Easy peasy :wink:
Nan

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by Funkdoobiest on Mon Nov 16, 2015 9:00 am

archangle wrote:
Funkdoobiest wrote:I noticed another post saying not to boil headgear. Can anyone give a legit reason not to boil headgear?


Some headgear has foam parts or stuff that appears to be glued together. I don't how well Velcro reacts to boiling water. If you have a set of headgear you are willing to sacrifice, you might try it and see what happens. Your results wouldn't necessarily apply to different models of headgear.

I have boiled the silicone parts of Swift FX headgear with no problem.


I was about to throw out the mask cause I got a new one so destroying it didn't bother me. BTW it was a Quattro FX.

It seems like the foam in the headgear is some sort of neoprene which I did a little research on first and saw that it has a fairly high melting point so I figured what the heck. The problem was it stretched out to the point where I ran out of room to affix the velcro on the top straps. Now that I have boiled the headgear and cushion I have a good backup mask. I can secure the velcro with about a half inch remaining on either sude to tighten more. I noticed the cushion still does not seal like new for whatever reason even though it looks and feels brand new. I may just pick up a new cushion for comparison to see if its me or the mask.

Also, as far as the temperature limitation on the package, I wonder if that is the temp range for performane furing usage, not the temp that it will be damaged. Obviously many of the components can withstand extreme tempeeatures, they just may not perform to specifications if outside the range

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by palerider on Thu Nov 12, 2015 7:02 pm

allen476 wrote:Holy cow, almost four years later this post is still kicking around. I should feel honored that anyone remembers it.

Anyways, I am glad that many have found it useful.


Froggy, I think... brought it to my attention a while back... good stuff.

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by allen476 on Thu Nov 12, 2015 6:02 pm

Holy cow, almost four years later this post is still kicking around. I should feel honored that anyone remembers it.

Anyways, I am glad that many have found it useful.

Now I need to make a post on how to get a DME to actually ship me my supplies. 3 months waiting for a simple PilairoQ cushion and chinstrap is becoming obscene. Good thing this boiling trick works.

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by WindCpap on Wed Nov 11, 2015 8:49 pm

I just looked this up on resmed's website. They call it "High level thermal disinfection".

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by archangle on Wed Nov 11, 2015 7:51 pm

Funkdoobiest wrote:I noticed another post saying not to boil headgear. Can anyone give a legit reason not to boil headgear?


Some headgear has foam parts or stuff that appears to be glued together. I don't how well Velcro reacts to boiling water. If you have a set of headgear you are willing to sacrifice, you might try it and see what happens. Your results wouldn't necessarily apply to different models of headgear.

I have boiled the silicone parts of Swift FX headgear with no problem.

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by SewTired on Wed Nov 11, 2015 1:52 pm

Funkdoobiest wrote:Many years later I yhank you for posting this I also tried boiling my headgear. Other than blue dye coming off and turning the water blue, boiling has rejuvenated my headgear quite a bit. It at least made it usable again. I will try to post when it is back to the worn out stage needing replacement. I noticed another post saying not to boil headgear. Can anyone give a legit reason not to boil headgear?


This is actually a good dead thread to revive because a lot of people don't know that they can attempt to revive their equipment and give it more life (saving them money). As to your specific question, some masks aren't intended for hospital use and contain OTHER plastics that aren't suitable for boiling. However, if you were just going to toss it, it's worth the effort to try it out. It may work. It may not. But you were going to throw it out anyway, right? With headgear, you know if it fits or not. With cushions, you will have far fewer leaks. However, if you see cracking or FEEL cracking, then it's time to throw because that will cause facial irritation and give rise to potential infection because of the wound.

Re: Boiling Stuff Part 2

Post by Funkdoobiest on Tue Nov 10, 2015 11:21 pm

Many years later I yhank you for posting this I also tried boiling my headgear. Other than blue dye coming off and turning the water blue, boiling has rejuvenated my headgear quite a bit. It at least made it usable again. I will try to post when it is back to the worn out stage needing replacement. I noticed another post saying not to boil headgear. Can anyone give a legit reason not to boil headgear?

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