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General Discussion on any topic relating to CPAP and/or Sleep Apnea.
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Oh 2 breathe
 
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Links to Articles Re: OSA and Depression

Postby Oh 2 breathe on Sun Oct 16, 2005 9:11 am

I have compiled these links for your information, but I want to add two important qualifiers:

1) Just because OSA symptoms are frequently confused with depression does not mean you don’t have depression. Depression is one of the most common health conditions in the world, with 1 in 5 people being diagnosable with this condition at some point in their lifespan. It is quite possible to have both depression and OSA.
2) If you are currently taking anti-depressant medication, now feel better with the CPAP treatment and think you might want to go off your medication --- be very careful. Sudden withdrawal from anti-depressants is very risky, and can create a severe rebound effect. As a mental health professional I have personally seen many people go through horrible withdrawals in which they have felt suicidal and even ended up in a psych ward because they tried to stop their medication too suddenly. Always check with your doctor before going off the anti-depressants. Your doctor will recommend a very slow tapering process. Don’t try to go off your meds while going through any kind of stressful transition in your life. Wait for a stable time in your life and preplan for extra support from your significant others during the tapering off period, which can last several months.

With those qualifyers, here are the links:

Treatment for Sleep Apnea May Ease Depression:
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/111/110118

Study finds link between sleep apnea, depression:
http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2 ... ssion.html

Depression and Obstructive Sleep Apnea:
http://www.annals-general-psychiatry.com/content/4/1/13

Sleep apnea can cause depression: http://www.healthyresources.com/sleep/a ... press.html

Sleep apnea, depression linked in Stanford study:
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 110603.php

Sleep Apnea Differs in Men, Women: Breathing disorder more often tied to depression, thyroid in women:
http://www.healthscout.com/news/1/524304/main.html

Symptoms of Depression in Individuals With Obstructive Sleep Apnea May Be Amenable to Treatment With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/513411

Depression as a manifestation of obstructive sleep apnea: reversal with nasal continuous positive airway pressure:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... t=Abstract

~OTB

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet..." ~ Robert Louis Stevenson

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Jere
 
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Postby Jere on Sun Oct 16, 2005 12:38 pm

From my own long-time experience - depression is very insidious and its causes are many. Lack of good sleep tends to make depression worse, but I think it is dangerous to think that depression could be caused by apnea and sleep deprivation. I have worked for years with both my psychiatrist and my sleep doctor to deal with (what we all thought was) anxiety-caused insomnia and depression. Once medication was found to stabilize the insomnia and depression (including zoloft for several years) it was then thought a good idea (due to snoring) that I get a sleep study and the apnea was diagnosed and CPAP diagnosed.

From better sleep due to CPAP and other shifts in medication, I am certainly feeling better. But I have no illusions that CPAP will somehow 'cure' my depression: ABSOLUTELY NOT. I have deluded myself over the years that this or that had 'cured' my depression and I could get off my meds and be normal, only to have the depression come back with a vengeance as soon as I went off the meds.

So, get as much sleep as you can and feel as good as you can BUT don't expect to be 'cured' by CPAP. True depression has a way of hiding just beneath the surface, biding its time; it WILL return as soon as you think you have it licked. And that is depressing as h :evil: ll.

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Last edited by Jere on Sun Oct 16, 2005 1:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Oh 2 breathe
 
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Postby Oh 2 breathe on Sun Oct 16, 2005 1:16 pm

Jere,

Thanks for adding your experience to my list of qualifiers.

I have never taken anti-depressants, but I've seen such disastrous results from the people I have worked who went off their meds suddenly I felt a responsibility to warn people.

I don't think the drug companies and doctors do enough to warn people ahead of time about the hell of going off the meds, and feel this should be carefully explained to potential consumers before they make the decision to go on them in the first place.

Many people take them and once they feel better they think they don’t need them any more. They think it’s like taking a pain medication i.e. when the headache goes away, they stop taking the aspirin. But the way it was explained to me is that as anti-depressants condition your brain to rely on externally supplied chemicals, the brain becomes a bit lazier about manufacturing and keeping its serotonin levels at an adequate level. If you suddenly remove that external boost, you risk crashing and feeling even worse than you did before starting the meds. This eventually works it self out but it can take many weeks of human misery while waiting for the brain to rebalance itself.

That said, I still believe that depression is often overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed and that anti-depressant prescriptions are handed out like candy with little thought about the long term effects. The pharmaceutical industry spends millions of dollars on marketing so that the meds are perceived as a benign, totally harmless therapy. Not that I am knocking anti-depressant use -- I've literally seen it save lives -- but I think it's just one of a whole range of effective strategies for creating a sense of well-being, including good nutrition, exercise, choosing healthier relationships, developing a good support system, learning how to grieve, healing core inner issues, finding work that is fulfilling, developing oneself spiritually, contributing to one's community, expressing oneself creatively and learning how to have fun. A tall order perhaps, but I believe this holistic approach to creating wellness is far more effective and long lasting than meds alone.

I wish you all the best in maintaining and developing the unique set of wellness strategies that are right for you.

~ OTB
"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet..." ~ Robert Louis Stevenson

Sleeping Better in Texas
 
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Postby Sleeping Better in Texas on Sun Oct 16, 2005 1:39 pm

OTB,

I couldn't have said it better nor have I ever seen it written better. Keep up the great work. You must be a wonderful, sought after counselor. I can't wait to see your continued progress on the board! :lol:

Thanks again, SBIT

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Jere
 
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Postby Jere on Sun Oct 16, 2005 1:55 pm

OTB - Thanks for the useful information you have posted. It will be a great source of help to many!

Oh 2 breathe wrote:I don't think the drug companies and doctors do enough to warn people ahead of time about the hell of going off the meds, and feel this should be carefully explained to potential consumers before they make the decision to go on them in the first place.
.


This a UNIVERSAL truth about these medicines. The first time I went off Zoloft I was given NO warnings. When I complained about the 'zaps,' the dizziness, and the rebound depression, my doctor thought I was crazy :wink: .

Many people take them and once they feel better they think they don’t need them any more. They think it’s like taking a pain medication i.e. when the headache goes away, they stop taking the aspirin.


This is my point exactly.


That said, I still believe that depression is often overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed and that anti-depressant prescriptions are handed out like candy with little thought about the long term effects.


From what you and Lori posted here and in another post ( http://www.cpaptalk.com/viewtopic.php?p=45855 ), misdiagnosing the sleep deprived with depression is not uncommon. For those "lucky' ones, getting good sleep can be the cure to misdiagnosed depression.

If I could make one suggestion to anyone thinking of getting off any anti-depressant: PLEASE, PLEASE don't start until you speak with a mental health professional. Get directions on how to tail off the meds and some information as to what to expect during the withdrawal process. NEVER go off this stuff cold turkey (and don't expect to find any of this information on the drug companies' websites).
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Postby cat-a-tonic on Sun Oct 16, 2005 11:43 pm

Thanks for adding this posting on depression. I am being treated for depression and anxiety and do not intend on making any medication changes unless my doctor and I are certain they re needed. I have taken the withdrawal route with both lexapro and cymbalta - head zaps and all (I know they are real, even though most doctors act as if they are non-existent. Take care and stay compliant with your CPAP.


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Jere
 
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Postby Jere on Mon Oct 17, 2005 7:41 pm

Cat -

Sounds like a plan. Keep it up!

I spent 8 weeks tapering off 50 mgs of zoloft (a pretty low dose), and still I endured about a month of the zaps. The stuff is nothing to mess with without a knowledgeable doctor.

Jerry
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Postby Jere on Mon Oct 17, 2005 8:20 pm

I added this thread to the FAQ. Hope nobody minds! :lol:
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Postby Guest on Sun Feb 03, 2008 3:55 pm

Medications to treat depression and/or anxiety work no better than a placebo in studies. The drug companies don't want you know this.

Here is an example of how statistics are used to manipulate doctors and how they prescribe medications.

commonground.ca/iss/198/cg198_cassels.shtml

Below that is also a link on how a lack of sleep and sleep deprivation can cause mood disorders such as anxiety and depression:

http://www.cpaptalk.com/viewtopic.php?t ... highlight=)

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????

Postby BigGayBert on Sun Feb 03, 2008 5:12 pm

Anonymous wrote:Medications to treat depression and/or anxiety work no better than a placebo in studies. The drug companies don't want you know this.

Here is an example of how statistics are used to manipulate doctors and how they prescribe medications.

commonground.ca/iss/198/cg198_cassels.shtml

Below that is also a link on how a lack of sleep and sleep deprivation can cause mood disorders such as anxiety and depression:

http://www.cpaptalk.com/viewtopic.php?t ... highlight=)


No to be rude, but if you were forced to spend a week with an unmedicated bipolar, schizophrenic, or extremely depressed person, or you would not make such ignorant statements. While there is absolutely no doubt that sleep disordered breathing can cause and exacerbate psychiatric illnesses, there is also no doubt that psychiatric drugs, including antidepressants, save lives. People spout lies like the ones above and convince people to ditch their antidepressant, mood stabilizing or antipsychotic drugs and people end up dead. Not only are lives lost through suicide and homicide, but the lives of those left behind are forever scarred. Please think about the safety and wellbeing of the members of this community before posting material that might cause others to harm themselves or their loved ones.

P.S. You would be quite surprised at how many of the people you know are taking psychiatric drugs. Most of us respond to medication, and we are able to blend in with you sane people and infiltrate your culture. It's scary because we look just like you!

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Postby Woody on Sun Feb 03, 2008 5:51 pm

Well I for one do have both sleap apnia and depression. The sleap apnia
just makes the depression worse. But the antidepresents I have been on cause weight gain which make my depression about being fat worse not to
mention making my sleep apnia worse.


Woody

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Postby Julie on Sun Feb 03, 2008 5:54 pm

Ummm - at least one of those links doesn't work - the one about women vs men (re thyroid etc.).

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Postby michaelho on Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:53 am

As a Clinical Pharmacist in Australia also unfortunately with OSA and a wife with depression (on medication) I can't help but wonder when people say that antidepressants have no effect and that the drug company just wants to con you (guest post).
Antidepressants treat real depression very well. However they do take a long time to kick in and they do take a long time (time dependent on which ones) to get off them. But compared with non treatment, I believe it's best to treat.
Also no one should just stop taking them and they should wean themselves off over a long period, with advice from their doctor and pharmacist after they have been treated for a long time. When the combined opinion from patient, family and professionals all agree , then it may be time to come off them as above.
I must admit for myself being a borderline depressed person, OSA doesn't help with depressed thinking. I'm sure it does 'feed into depression' - ie lack of sleep, exhaustion, difficulties at work etc.

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Postby Wulfman on Mon Feb 04, 2008 10:22 am

Julie wrote:Ummm - at least one of those links doesn't work - the one about women vs men (re thyroid etc.).


Considering this thread was about 2 1/2 years old, that's not too surprising.


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