Quantcast

Bookmark and Share
General Discussion on any topic relating to CPAP and/or Sleep Apnea.
User avatar
Jay Aitchsee
 
Posts: 2502
Joined: Sun May 22, 2011 12:47 pm
Location: Southwest Florida
Gender: Male

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Jay Aitchsee on Mon Jul 04, 2016 11:40 am

DreamStalker wrote:If it's pooping...For trigs .... lower carbs intake


Yeah, I like cabbage and have it fairly often, fried, boiled, as slaw and, if I make it, in soup.

The Trigs and carbs relationship is what made me suspect the oatmeal. Other than oatmeal, I eat no refined carbs. What carbs I do eat come from above ground vegetables, legumes, nuts, and fruits in moderation. By far, the highest concentration of carbs eaten is in the oatmeal and beans (which I usually have cold with a vinegar and oil dressing). I haven't tested beans for BG impact. I will, but I'm guessing it's low. And now we're learning beans are good source of RS.

For exercise, I do a fair amount of yard work on my five acres, which here in Florida translates into using loppers, a walk behind brush mower, heavy duty line trimer, swinging a small chain saw, and some moderately heavy lifting for a few hours a week (I don't count the riding mower), but no structured weight training. Additionally, weather permitting, I ride 15 to 20 miles a day on my hybrid bike at a fairly good clip (about 15 mph), which does get my heart rate up for some of that hour or so that I ride, but I haven't measured it exactly. I'm pretty sure I exceed the 180-age criteria, though. For me, that would only be 106 (you can do the math :D ).

_________________
Mask: AirFit™ P10 Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Headgear
Humidifier: S9™ Series H5i™ Heated Humidifier with Climate Control
Additional Comments: DreamWear Nasal Mask, P=7.0, EPR3, ResScan 5.3, SleepyHead 9.8, Windows 10, ZEO, CMS50F, Infrared Video

Julie
 
Posts: 14590
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2006 12:58 pm
Location: Canada E.
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Julie on Mon Jul 04, 2016 11:45 am

What do you all think of the new research that says one solitary minute of intense working out daily can give you the same benefits of much longer, if not as intense work-outs?

User avatar
Janknitz
 
Posts: 6505
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 1:05 pm
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Janknitz on Mon Jul 04, 2016 11:57 am

Jay Aitchsee wrote:Re: DS above,

Yes, I'm interested in RS as well. I put some rolled oats in the fridge to soak, I've ordered some Bob's unmodified potato starch, and I think I'll buy a couple potatoes (I don't have any in the house). I plan on doing a few experiments, too.

As I mentioned above somewhere, oatmeal was originally added to my Whole Foods Diet (I try to eat very little processed foods) as a digestive aid and it worked for me. Even though I try to include a generous amount of vegetable in my diet, including some legumes (black beans and garbanzos), being on lower carb seems to slow things down. Now, only after about 3 days without oatmeal, I can tell things are slowing, even though I've added spinach and tomatoes to my egg breakfast to counter the fiber lost in giving up oatmeal. So it's possible I simply need more soluble fiber than most. BTW, I am (and have been) supplementing with psyllium fiber (Konsyl) which does, according to the label, contain about the same mix of soluble and insoluble fiber as oatmeal.

It should be noted here, since this is a thread about statins and indirectly about blood lipids, that blood lipid is what prompted me to start looking at the oatmeal. Over the winter, I fell off my diet for a couple months and a lipid panel revealed: TG=189, HDL=37, LDL=80. After getting back to eating "right" and more regular exercise for about 3 months, my lipids were: TG=110, HDL=44, LDL=57. Certainly a move in the right direction and not too bad, but I fully expected my TG (which I consider most important) to be down in the 70-80 range that it was last fall. So I started looking for what might be holding it up and the oatmeal became suspect - which led to the BG testing which revealed it was causing a pretty high spike.

So now the questions become, will eliminating oatmeal bring my TG down? And, if so, will it allow my LDL to rise (since oatmeal is one of those things thought to reduce LDL)? Now, I happen to believe high TG posses more of a threat than LDL and I'm willing to give up a little in LDL to get my TG down, but, as a person with CAD, I think it wise to keep an eye on both. Oh, and very importantly, will I be able to poop?


Jay, keep in mind that LDL is about QUALITY not quantity. Small, dense LDL is harmful, and keeping LDL low by oatmeal is not beneficial. http://www.cureality.com/blog/post/2010 ... r-bad.html

Ideally you want to get trigs down, HDL up. That is an indicator of good quality LDL (large and "fluffy") regardless of number. It also means that inflammation and insulin resistance are low and THAT's what you want. LDL-C is pretty irrelevant unless you soar into the FH range.

One commentator said it's easy enough to get LDL-C down by replacing saturated fat with polyunsaturated oils. But you aren't healthier--inflammation is higher and CV risk increases.

So do you want numbers that look good to the uneducated or true health???
What you need to know before you meet your DME http://tinyurl.com/2arffqx
Taming the Mirage Quattro http://tinyurl.com/2ft3lh8
Swift FX Fitting Guide http://tinyurl.com/22ur9ts
Don't Pay that Upcharge! http://tinyurl.com/2ck48rm

User avatar
Janknitz
 
Posts: 6505
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 1:05 pm
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Janknitz on Mon Jul 04, 2016 12:00 pm

Julie wrote:What do you all think of the new research that says one solitary minute of intense working out daily can give you the same benefits of much longer, if not as intense work-outs?


One minute is a bit of a stretch. But you can get a LOT more benefit from very intense exercise like sprints or heavy lifting for 10 or 20 minutes a few times a week than hours of daily aerobic exercise. My husband is starting to train me on kettlebells.
What you need to know before you meet your DME http://tinyurl.com/2arffqx
Taming the Mirage Quattro http://tinyurl.com/2ft3lh8
Swift FX Fitting Guide http://tinyurl.com/22ur9ts
Don't Pay that Upcharge! http://tinyurl.com/2ck48rm

User avatar
DreamStalker
 
Posts: 7223
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:58 am
Location: Garden of Ecotone
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby DreamStalker on Mon Jul 04, 2016 12:16 pm

Jay Aitchsee wrote:
DreamStalker wrote:If it's pooping...For trigs .... lower carbs intake


Yeah, I like cabbage and have it fairly often, fried, boiled, as slaw and, if I make it, in soup.

The Trigs and carbs relationship is what made me suspect the oatmeal. Other than oatmeal, I eat no refined carbs. What carbs I do eat come from above ground vegetables, legumes, nuts, and fruits in moderation. By far, the highest concentration of carbs eaten is in the oatmeal and beans (which I usually have cold with a vinegar and oil dressing). I haven't tested beans for BG impact. I will, but I'm guessing it's low. And now we're learning beans are good source of RS.

For exercise, I do a fair amount of yard work on my five acres, which here in Florida translates into using loppers, a walk behind brush mower, heavy duty line trimer, swinging a small chain saw, and some moderately heavy lifting for a few hours a week (I don't count the riding mower), but no structured weight training. Additionally, weather permitting, I ride 15 to 20 miles a day on my hybrid bike at a fairly good clip (about 15 mph), which does get my heart rate up for some of that hour or so that I ride, but I haven't measured it exactly. I'm pretty sure I exceed the 180-age criteria, though. For me, that would only be 106 (you can do the math :D ).


If you don't have a chest-strap type HR monitor, a fairly good way to determine if you're in the Maffetone aerobic zone is to make sure that you're able to comfortably breathe only through your nose ... once the physical effort requires that you breathe through your mouth, you have exceeded your MAF heart rate and you need to slow down (stay right in that zone with maximum effort without using mouth to breathe). The actual amount of effort is different for each person but that is a good measure of the 180 - age heart rate target and I have found the nasal breathing limit to be fairly accurate.

The purpose of the HIT weight training is metabolic in addition to building/maintaining strength and muscle mass. HIT weight training is performed such that you completely fatigue muscles within a window of 60 to 90 seconds for each exercise. Less than 60 seconds does not provide the metabolic benefits while greater than 90 seconds does not provide enough effort. It has to do with Type II muscle fibers being forced into the lactate energy pathway to stimulate mitochondrial growth and biogenesis which in turn stimulate the production of enzymes and transport mechanisms like insulin receptors that help you become more tolerant of both insulin and glucose.

As for legumes and fruit, they too add to the daily accrued total of carb to glucose intake. While they may not "spike" ... it still comes down to the total integral area under the curve and that is what stimulates your liver to create the trigs. And the insulin resistance/lack of insulin receptors keeps them high. So, yes, You have plenty of hidden carbs and if you want to continue to eat them you have to do at the very least, intermittent fasting to give your body a chance to clear out the trigs and glucose. Also do your exercise in a fasted state.
Thanks Snoredog, GoofyUT, rested gal, GoofProof, Wulfman, NightHawkeye, snoregirl and all of the others.
From 102 AHI to 0.4 AHI for over 10 yrs now :)
What's permaculture? Go here -> http://www.geofflawtononline.com/videos/

User avatar
DreamStalker
 
Posts: 7223
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:58 am
Location: Garden of Ecotone
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby DreamStalker on Mon Jul 04, 2016 12:24 pm

Janknitz wrote:
Julie wrote:What do you all think of the new research that says one solitary minute of intense working out daily can give you the same benefits of much longer, if not as intense work-outs?


One minute is a bit of a stretch. But you can get a LOT more benefit from very intense exercise like sprints or heavy lifting for 10 or 20 minutes a few times a week than hours of daily aerobic exercise. My husband is starting to train me on kettlebells.


Julie did not quite word it correctly. The muscle group needs to be exercised at a level of intensity to go to failure (ie. complete muscle fatigue) within a window of 60 to 90 seconds ... see my response to Jay above. Refer to Doug McGuff's Body by Science for biochemical and metabolic details as well as exercise approach.

Maffetone on the other hand is at the other end of the spectrum and strives for development of an aerobic foundation so that mitochondria use the aerobic path and stimulate similar metabolic pathways and transport mechanisms as BBS.

However BBS approach can only be done once every 7 to 10 days and requires muscle rest in between. So use BBS (which has minor negative effect on Maffetone approach when done just one day per week) only one day per week and use Maffetone (which does not interfere with BBS lactic anaerobic energy pathway development) 5 days per week for optimal results ... using day after BBS workout for complete rest.
Thanks Snoredog, GoofyUT, rested gal, GoofProof, Wulfman, NightHawkeye, snoregirl and all of the others.
From 102 AHI to 0.4 AHI for over 10 yrs now :)
What's permaculture? Go here -> http://www.geofflawtononline.com/videos/

User avatar
Jay Aitchsee
 
Posts: 2502
Joined: Sun May 22, 2011 12:47 pm
Location: Southwest Florida
Gender: Male

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Jay Aitchsee on Mon Jul 04, 2016 3:24 pm

DreamStalker wrote:If you don't have a chest-strap type HR monitor, a fairly good way to determine if you're in the Maffetone aerobic zone is to make sure that you're able to comfortably breathe only through your nose...
The purpose of the HIT weight training is metabolic in addition to building/maintaining strength and muscle mass. HIT weight training is performed such that you completely fatigue muscles within a window of 60 to 90 seconds for each exercise....
As for legumes and fruit, they too add to the daily accrued total of carb to glucose intake...

Thanks for the tips DS, I'm going to look further into HIT weight training. I don't have a chest strap, but I kind of do the Maffetone thing now, without knowing the specifics. My rides average about an hour or maybe a little longer and I try to ride into the wind outbound while maintaining a speed that requires heavy nose but not mouth breathing. I know in advance that speed would be about 15mph, no wind, so I have a target to shoot for. On the inbound leg, I just try to maintain at least 15mph. This isn't static, I've got about 2200 miles on this bike and when I started my target was 13, so there's been some steady improvement. As for the legumes and fruit, yes if my TG doesn't come down, they're next.

Janknitz wrote:...Ideally you want to get trigs down, HDL up. That is an indicator of good quality LDL (large and "fluffy") regardless of number. It also means that inflammation and insulin resistance are low and THAT's what you want. LDL-C is pretty irrelevant unless you soar into the FH range...


Right, Jan, I agree and that's why I said I would give up LDL for TG. I know I can get my TG down through diet. I also know I can raise my HDL by increasing my percentage of saturated fats, and exercise, but only so far. If you recall some years ago (2012), I did have an NMR which indicated my percentage of small LDL p was higher than desired. After that, I took steps to raise my HDL and lower my TG and was successful in lowering my TG, but not so much with HDL. I did bring it up, from low 30's into mid 40's, but that seemed to be about the upper limit without trying medication which I didn't want to do. I did well for about 3 years until too many cruises and vacations got the better of me. You know - "one piece of cake won't hurt". But of course, one leads to another with ice cream and there you go. And here I am, back to work at it. Thanks for your help.

Interestingly and anecdotally, I took my lunch before meal BG a bit ago and it was only 100. That's low for me, my fasting BG is usually about 106. At first, I wondered if it could be the oatmeal I gave up, but probably not. I haven't taken many pre prandial tests and it could be normal for me while my morning fasting BG runs a little higher.

_________________
Mask: AirFit™ P10 Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Headgear
Humidifier: S9™ Series H5i™ Heated Humidifier with Climate Control
Additional Comments: DreamWear Nasal Mask, P=7.0, EPR3, ResScan 5.3, SleepyHead 9.8, Windows 10, ZEO, CMS50F, Infrared Video

User avatar
Jay Aitchsee
 
Posts: 2502
Joined: Sun May 22, 2011 12:47 pm
Location: Southwest Florida
Gender: Male

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Jay Aitchsee on Tue Jul 12, 2016 4:00 pm

So DreamStalker, did you do the potato salad test, yet?

I have tested the oatmeal. Each test consisted of 1/3 cup dry rolled oats and 2/3 cup water prepared as follows:

Cooked rolled oats eaten warm raises my I hr. postprandial BG to an average of about 142, returning to normal at 2 hrs.

Cold soaked rolled oats (1 part oats, two parts water refrigerated over night) eaten cold raises my BG to an average of about 135 after 1 hr. returning to normal at 2 (maybe some RS action).

Cold soaked rolled oats microwaved 1 minute (which is boiling for a few seconds) eaten warm raised my BG to 150! No 2 hr. test.

No more oatmeal for me.

_________________
Mask: AirFit™ P10 Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Headgear
Humidifier: S9™ Series H5i™ Heated Humidifier with Climate Control
Additional Comments: DreamWear Nasal Mask, P=7.0, EPR3, ResScan 5.3, SleepyHead 9.8, Windows 10, ZEO, CMS50F, Infrared Video

User avatar
palerider
 
Posts: 16756
Joined: Wed Dec 16, 2009 5:43 pm
Location: Dallas(ish).
Gender: Male

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby palerider on Tue Jul 12, 2016 4:42 pm

Jay Aitchsee wrote:So DreamStalker, did you do the potato salad test, yet?

I have tested the oatmeal. Each test consisted of 1/3 cup dry rolled oats and 2/3 cup water prepared as follows:

Cooked rolled oats eaten warm raises my I hr. postprandial BG to an average of about 142, returning to normal at 2 hrs.

Cold soaked rolled oats (1 part oats, two parts water refrigerated over night) eaten cold raises my BG to an average of about 135 after 1 hr. returning to normal at 2 (maybe some RS action).

Cold soaked rolled oats microwaved 1 minute (which is boiling for a few seconds) eaten warm raised my BG to 150! No 2 hr. test.

No more oatmeal for me.


ISTR rolled oats are the worst, steel cut are less bad.

_________________
Mask: AirFit™ P10 Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Headgear
Additional Comments: S9 Vpap Auto
come hang out on IRC and chat: irc.freenode.net, ##cpaptalk
https://sleep.tnet.com/resources/sleepyhead
Don't confuse my personality with my attitude. My personality is who I am. My attitude depends on who YOU are.

User avatar
Jay Aitchsee
 
Posts: 2502
Joined: Sun May 22, 2011 12:47 pm
Location: Southwest Florida
Gender: Male

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Jay Aitchsee on Tue Jul 12, 2016 5:42 pm

palerider wrote:ISTR rolled oats are the worst, steel cut are less bad.

Yes, but rolled oats supposedly have one of the highest levels of resistant starch of commonly consumed foods. Resistant Starches are supposed not to cause blood glucose spikes and are good for colon health among other things. Problem is, it looks like the oats have to be consumed dry (at least for me) to maintain the starch content in a resistant form. In some foods, like potato, the starch is in resistant form prior to cooking, changes to non resistant with cooking, but then retrogrades to resistant when cooled. So, supposedly, one could eat potatoes raw or cooled and gain the benefit of resistant starch.

Personally, I would rather eat raw potatoes than raw oats, rolled or steel cut. But I like eggs better than either, so that's what I'm going with :)

_________________
Mask: AirFit™ P10 Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Headgear
Humidifier: S9™ Series H5i™ Heated Humidifier with Climate Control
Additional Comments: DreamWear Nasal Mask, P=7.0, EPR3, ResScan 5.3, SleepyHead 9.8, Windows 10, ZEO, CMS50F, Infrared Video

User avatar
Sir NoddinOff
 
Posts: 4197
Joined: Mon May 14, 2012 5:30 pm
Location: California
Gender: Male

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Sir NoddinOff on Tue Jul 19, 2016 10:23 am

Here's an interesting article about naturally occurring statins, generally from fermentation processes... it's based on a small sample group but is noteworthy.

https://www.luckyvitamin.com/HealthLibr ... c/~default

_________________
Mask: AirFit™ F10 Full Face Mask with Headgear
Humidifier: PR System One 50 Series Heated Humidifier
Additional Comments: Sleepyhead software v.0.9.8.1 Open GL and Encore Pro v2.2.
I like my ResMed AirFit F10 FFM - reasonably low leaks for my ASV therapy. I'm currently using a PR S1 AutoSV 960P Advanced. I also keep a ResMed S9 Adapt as backup. I use a heated Hibernite hose. Still rockin' with Win 7 by using GWX to stop Win 10.

User avatar
Janknitz
 
Posts: 6505
Joined: Sat Mar 20, 2010 1:05 pm
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Janknitz on Wed Jul 20, 2016 1:20 pm

Sir NoddinOff wrote:Here's an interesting article about naturally occurring statins, generally from fermentation processes... it's based on a small sample group but is noteworthy.

https://www.luckyvitamin.com/HealthLibr ... c/~default


Interesting. I hope they are not "natural statins". Statins lower cholesterol by interfering with a normal and very critical metabolic pathway known as the Mevalonate pathway. http://www.zoeharcombe.com/2013/10/how- ... at-a-time/

Hopefully, what these foods do is enhance the metabolism, not suppress it as statins do. As fermented foods, one thing they all have in common is Vitamin K2. I supplement Vitamin K2 because it's also a good calcium regulator in the body--keeping calcium in your bones and not in your arteries.

No surprise that cultures that eat a lot of fermented foods traditionally have lower levels of cardiovascular disease, generally speaking.
What you need to know before you meet your DME http://tinyurl.com/2arffqx
Taming the Mirage Quattro http://tinyurl.com/2ft3lh8
Swift FX Fitting Guide http://tinyurl.com/22ur9ts
Don't Pay that Upcharge! http://tinyurl.com/2ck48rm

User avatar
Jay Aitchsee
 
Posts: 2502
Joined: Sun May 22, 2011 12:47 pm
Location: Southwest Florida
Gender: Male

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby Jay Aitchsee on Sat Mar 18, 2017 5:58 am

The headline: "New injectable drug, evolocumab, reduces heart attack risk by 20%"
http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/healtht ... spartanntp

The Study wrote: evolocumab significantly reduced the risk of the key secondary composite end point of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The key secondary end point occurred in 816 patients (5.9%) in the evolocumab group and in 1013 patients (7.4%)

What it means (my interpretation): The number of patients suffering subsequent heart attacks or strokes with this treatment compared to a placebo was reduced from 7 per hundred to 6.

Furthermore,
The Study wrote:In terms of individual outcomes, evolocumab had no observed effect on cardiovascular mortality...
[with] no observed effect on the rates of hospitalization for unstable angina, cardiovascular death or hospitalization for worsening heart failure, or death from any cause


The cost: $14000 per year

_________________
Mask: AirFit™ P10 Nasal Pillow CPAP Mask with Headgear
Humidifier: S9™ Series H5i™ Heated Humidifier with Climate Control
Additional Comments: DreamWear Nasal Mask, P=7.0, EPR3, ResScan 5.3, SleepyHead 9.8, Windows 10, ZEO, CMS50F, Infrared Video

User avatar
DreamStalker
 
Posts: 7223
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:58 am
Location: Garden of Ecotone
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby DreamStalker on Sat Mar 18, 2017 6:33 am

Jay Aitchsee wrote:The headline: "New injectable drug, evolocumab, reduces heart attack risk by 20%"
http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/healtht ... spartanntp

The Study wrote: evolocumab significantly reduced the risk of the key secondary composite end point of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The key secondary end point occurred in 816 patients (5.9%) in the evolocumab group and in 1013 patients (7.4%)

What it means (my interpretation): The number of patients suffering subsequent heart attacks or strokes with this treatment compared to a placebo was reduced from 7 per hundred to 6.

Furthermore,
The Study wrote:In terms of individual outcomes, evolocumab had no observed effect on cardiovascular mortality...
[with] no observed effect on the rates of hospitalization for unstable angina, cardiovascular death or hospitalization for worsening heart failure, or death from any cause


The cost: $14000 per year

I listened to one of the researchers interviewed on NPR yesterday and he noted that mortality rates were not lowered because it was only a 2-year clinical study .... so to me, that means they also don't know the more harmful side effects of the new class of drugs either. He said he was "confident" that with further study, they could reduce mortality rates. :roll: :roll: :roll:

Just another marketing scam. Big pharma drug patents on statins are expiring and they need another cash cow class of drugs to milk the fake war on "cholesterol causes heart disease" meme.

Just stop eating insulinemic and inflammatory foods and move your body intensely on a frequent basis. Use the $14000 per year cost savings on high quality food and gym membership instead.
Thanks Snoredog, GoofyUT, rested gal, GoofProof, Wulfman, NightHawkeye, snoregirl and all of the others.
From 102 AHI to 0.4 AHI for over 10 yrs now :)
What's permaculture? Go here -> http://www.geofflawtononline.com/videos/

User avatar
DreamStalker
 
Posts: 7223
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 9:58 am
Location: Garden of Ecotone
Gender: None specified

Re: OT - Statins and You

Postby DreamStalker on Sat Mar 18, 2017 7:14 am

Jay Aitchsee wrote:So DreamStalker, did you do the potato salad test, yet?

I have tested the oatmeal. Each test consisted of 1/3 cup dry rolled oats and 2/3 cup water prepared as follows:

Cooked rolled oats eaten warm raises my I hr. postprandial BG to an average of about 142, returning to normal at 2 hrs.

Cold soaked rolled oats (1 part oats, two parts water refrigerated over night) eaten cold raises my BG to an average of about 135 after 1 hr. returning to normal at 2 (maybe some RS action).

Cold soaked rolled oats microwaved 1 minute (which is boiling for a few seconds) eaten warm raised my BG to 150! No 2 hr. test.

No more oatmeal for me.


Yes. I did eventually do the potato salad test and it surprisingly did not spike my glucose levels as I thought it would (sorry I didn't come back to report back then). I used Yukon Gold and Red potatoes boiled and then chilled in frig over night. In AM I added the dressing mix (whatever low-carb veggies are available in frig at time) + vinaigrette + tumeric powder, sea salt, black pepper .... and BACON! :D :D Glucose max was under 105 around 30 minutes (back under 100 within a couple of hours) after a large serving meal (about 4 cups) which kept me in full satiety for about 24 hours. I'm sure you could add organic mayo and/or mustard instead of vinaigrette.

I also got similar glucose response with frozen "organic" potato puffs (tater tots) stir fried with bacon pieces (plus rendered fat) and other low-carb veggies (onions, peppers, celery, etc.) into a potato hash and then allowed to cool to room temperature plus some chilled guacamole .... Mmmmmm . The trick I think is to cook the tater puffs just enough to thaw out a bit and break apart, which leaves them in the resistant starch state.

When I oven baked the same brand tater puffs .... I got a massive glucose spike (around 180's) ... even after allowing them to cool to room temps. The baking must have ruined the resistant starch state. I don't know. Maybe I over-baked them as they were crunchy on the outside. But I like my stir fried hash version better anyway. :)

As for oatmeal. No matter what kind or how I cook oatmeal .... always a glucose spike around 140 -150 ... but stays high for several hours.

Also ... make sure you only use "organic" potatoes to insure they are not the GMO potatoes (very bad no matter how they are cooked/eaten).

U.S. approves 3 more types of Simplot GMO potatoes for sale this year

If you want to avoid genetically modified spuds, these tips can help.
Beware of the brand names Ranger Russet, Russet Burbank, and Atlantic
Look for merits on the label like “reduced bruising” and “fewer black spots”
Look for any reference or link to the J.R. Simplot Company
Look for the word “innate” on the label
Buy organic potatoes whenever possible
Look for the “Non-GMO Project Verified” label (Wisconsin Healthy Grown is one brand that has this seal)
Consider buying Yukon Gold or a more rare variety
Be leery of processed food containing potatoes, like frozen fries, tater tots, and chips. (Kettle Chips are non-GMO verified) Buy organic if you must get processed potatoes.
Restaurants may also be likely to use GMO potatoes since they don’t brown as easily as regular potatoes
Thanks Snoredog, GoofyUT, rested gal, GoofProof, Wulfman, NightHawkeye, snoregirl and all of the others.
From 102 AHI to 0.4 AHI for over 10 yrs now :)
What's permaculture? Go here -> http://www.geofflawtononline.com/videos/

PreviousNext

Return to CPAP and Sleep Apnea (CLICK HERE TO READ POSTS)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 28 guests