Hypopnea vs Apnea

General Discussion on any topic relating to CPAP and/or Sleep Apnea.
sleep_apnea_suffer

Re: Hypopnea vs Apnea

Post by sleep_apnea_suffer » Sun Nov 12, 2017 4:20 am

Captain_Midnight wrote:SAS asks...Why are these people who interpret these home sleep tests, mix the two up together(Hypopnea and OSAs), when are not the same thing. One is partial obstruction the other one is fully obstruction. Should I go for another test? As in Inlab sleep test?

I think that hyponeas are highly under-rated as far as severity of secondary sequelae (health effects which result from the original condition of sleep disordered breathing.)

I strongly suspect that, in many cases, hypopneas would have been full apnea occlusions, but your body's fight-or-flight hormone response elevates your sleep level enough to avoid suffocation. The stress hormone epinephrine is a major culprit here; also, cortisol is released at the same time, all which do not play nice with your over-all health and well-being.

If one considers the possibility that hypopneas might be a fight-or-flight response to what might have been a full apnea, then their seriousness comes into better view.

Interestingly, a quick lit search could not locate any scientific studies to support my suspicion about hypopneas, but I'll look more thoroughly when I can take the time.

Good luck in your decision on whether to get that additional test.



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The home sleep I did was pretty comprehensive. It had 12 channels so I will be speaking with the sleep physican asking what we can do. Also, not sure what drugs the scientists was on but she thinks that getting 5.30 hours of sleep is efficient sleep because I was getting rem sleep. My oxygen Saturation was minimum of 87 while on my back and an average of 93. It was like this on my sides too.

This was the results of my Hypopnea.
Longest Apnea | Hypopnea 10 | 21 sec
Mean Apnea / Hypopnea duration 13 sec
Mean Heart Rate 72bpm
I still feel like I have hit a brick wall when I wakeup.

sleep_apnea_suffer

Re: Hypopnea vs Apnea

Post by sleep_apnea_suffer » Sun Nov 12, 2017 11:43 am

I wonder who writes garbage like this?
www(dot)ncbi(dot)nlm(dot)nih(dot)gov/pmc/articles/PMC2564770/

Jesus christ. Who gives these doctors degrees is beyond me. Mild or not, it's still makes you feel awful.

sleep_apnea_suffer

Re: Hypopnea vs Apnea

Post by sleep_apnea_suffer » Sun Nov 12, 2017 11:48 am

xxyzx wrote:
TedVPAP wrote:
xxyzx wrote:
TedVPAP wrote:
sleep_apnea_suffer wrote:I am confused at hell at the sleep report I have been given. I did a sleep test and it found out that I had mild apnea, with no OSA/Central or REARS. I still have hypnoea but don't have OSA anymore. The strange thing is that the conclusion says that I have mild OSA. Why are these people who interpret these home sleep tests, mix the two up together(Hypopnea and OSAs), when are not the same thing. One is partial obstruction the other one is fully obstruction. Should I go for another test? As in Inlab sleep test?
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Since this guest post makes no sense and has made no attempt to clarify/correct, I think it is best if it is ignored until the OP corrects the obvious mistakes in sentence 2, 3, 5.
I am not trying to be a PITA but when people pose questions which obviously displays confusion (or are trolls), I do not think it is best to give advice until the confusion has been resolved. But that is just my pet peeve.
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the post makes perfect sense
the problem is with real english vs sleep jargon

there is no confusion by the guest
the confusion is by the sleep industry using one term for two problems
he does NOT have OA
he does have hypops
he wants to know why they call that OSA when there is no apnea only hypops

the problem is AHI is used to diagnose OSA whether you have OA or not

the question makes sense
the use of AHI when there is no A is what is misleading
as is the diagnose of OSA when there is no OA
I think we all agree that OSA is determined based on A and H. The OP does not have any A but does have H, but doesn't understand why the diagnosis of OSA is still valid since A=0???? If my understanding of the OP's confusion is correct, then the answer is simply that OSA is diagnosed based on A and H as both are relevant to OSA.
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i agree

the OP was confused because he did not have full apnea but was diagnosed with OSA based on partials aka hypops which are a lot different
Exactly. The summary of the report said that I had mild Obstructive hypopnea. I am not sure how it came to that conclusion. They keep wanting to drug me.

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Pugsy
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Re: Hypopnea vs Apnea

Post by Pugsy » Sun Nov 12, 2017 11:53 am

sleep_apnea_suffer wrote:The summary of the report said that I had mild Obstructive hypopnea. I am not sure how it came to that conclusion.
They get mild, moderate or severe by the AHI numbers.

http://healthysleep.med.harvard.edu/sle ... ng-results
None/Minimal: AHI < 5 per hour
Mild: AHI ≥ 5, but < 15 per hour
Moderate: AHI ≥ 15, but < 30 per hour
Severe: AHI ≥ 30 per hour
Unfortunately how you actually feel doesn't get taken into account when it comes to the actual diagnosis.
And a person can feel like total crap with the "mild" numbers.
I may have to RISE but I refuse to SHINE.

sleep_apnea_suffer

Re: Hypopnea vs Apnea

Post by sleep_apnea_suffer » Sun Nov 12, 2017 12:40 pm

Pugsy wrote:
sleep_apnea_suffer wrote:The summary of the report said that I had mild Obstructive hypopnea. I am not sure how it came to that conclusion.
They get mild, moderate or severe by the AHI numbers.


None/Minimal: AHI < 5 per hour
Mild: AHI ≥ 5, but < 15 per hour
Moderate: AHI ≥ 15, but < 30 per hour
Severe: AHI ≥ 30 per hour
Unfortunately how you actually feel doesn't get taken into account when it comes to the actual diagnosis.
And a person can feel like total crap with the "mild" numbers.
I understand that but these doctors don't want to help out the patient. They don't realize that CO2 is a toxic gas that we expire when we breath out. If you breathe shallow, it is going to have detrimental effects if it goes on for days/weeks/months or even years.