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Re: boiling stuff

Post by LSAT on Sat Feb 25, 2012 4:15 pm

Boiling works for silicone...read this post.
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=74686&p=685106#p685106

Re: boiling stuff

Post by Kohkie on Sat Feb 25, 2012 3:28 pm

I was planning on replacing my nasal pillows tonight. So after reading this thread, I thought "what the heck". So grabbed old nasal pillows, I was going to throw away anyhow, and have them boiling now. Will post tomorrow and let everyone know how it went. What I've noticed is that the pillows get too soft and flexible with time and my AHI starts to go up. Am boiling them for 20 minutes.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by soundersfootballclub on Sat Feb 18, 2012 12:56 am

VVV wrote:

I just have to ask, has anyone tried battering and deep frying?


Yes, but I suggest you add some cayenne pepper half way through!

Re: boiling stuff

Post by a1albert on Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:46 pm

Yes I boil my swift Lt pillows. After they seem to have worn out and start leaking bad I put them in water and boil them, it seems to bring them back to life. I have a stock pile of new ones that the insurance company has bought waiting for my old ones to give up. Boiling seems to work for me but you may not like it, give it a try on some old pillows and see what happens. How long to boil I don't know, I have fogot about them on the stove and came back and found the water almost boiled away and they still are good. As far as other types of mask or pillows go it is worth a try if you have a new one if it don't work.

Albert

Re: boiling stuff

Post by LinkC on Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:38 pm

I think people are confusing sterilization with "revitalization". The OP isn't worried about germs, but trying to regain that "tacky" quality of new silicone. I've found that boiling isn't necessary. I draw a sinkfull of hot, soapy water and let the pillows and cushion soak until the water cools. Then rinse, shake and air dry. That works about 3 or 4 times, then you need some new parts. I *think* what happens is you remove skin oil that has absorbed into the silicone. Often you can rub "crumbs" off the surface of the silicone as you are scrubbing with your fingers. Boiling is not necessary for revitalization.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by archangle on Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:25 pm

It probably bears repeating that there are some germs that can survive boiling water temperatures. For instance, when canning food, you have to heat to 250F in a pressure cooker to be sure to kill the bacteria that cause botulism.

Luckily, most of the germs that we worry about will die even below boiling temperatures.

You also have to keep things at the temperature for long enough. A quick dip may not do the job.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by VVV on Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:01 pm

archangle wrote:

I'd boil the water, turn off the heat, let it sit for a minute or so and then drop the parts in. Or make something to hold the parts up from the bottom of the pot if you want to actually boil the parts.


srodeman8 wrote:Hi, the best thing to do is to get the water to boiling, then turn it off for a minute and then put in nasal pillows and leave in there for an hour or so, then shake to get all the remaining water out in the bathtub, and then dry out. Be sure it is COMPLETELY dry before using again. A blow dryer may be used. Don't boil, but do the next best thing.


chunkyfrog wrote:I might consider using the steamer,


Robespierre wrote:As long as the silicone parts aren't resting on the bottom of the pot, you won't damage them with boiling water. Boiling water (100°C) should not be hot enough to damage the silicone, which is typically cured at 120°C to 165°C.


I just have to ask, has anyone tried battering and deep frying?

Re: boiling stuff

Post by -tim on Fri Feb 17, 2012 9:44 pm

In the world of organic chemistry, lots of things start to happen at about 40 °C (104 °F). Some of those things may help or hurt the flexibility. Other things happen at boiling.

If your going to do this, start out with keeping the mask in 40°C water for a while and see if that helps. Then try again at just under boiling and then try boiling. It maybe be warm but not too hot is the right mix.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by Robespierre on Fri Feb 17, 2012 11:56 am

As long as the silicone parts aren't resting on the bottom of the pot, you won't damage them with boiling water. Boiling water (100°C) should not be hot enough to damage the silicone, which is typically cured at 120°C to 165°C. It might be a little soft until it dries completely, as silicone is permeable to water vapor.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by DrBucky on Fri Feb 17, 2012 11:39 am

chunkyfrog wrote:My kids were both bottle babies--(back before breastfeeding was considered 'primitive')
Anyhow, I started out boiling their bottles and nipples (they were latex, then)
I stopped when I accidentally boiled the pot dry (probably had apnea then)
Do people sterilize baby stuff now?--the nipples are silicone--like our interface parts.
I might consider using the steamer, but it didn't work that well on edamame.


Rather than boiling you probably could get by with a microwaveable baby bottle sterilizer. Basically they are a covered dish that you put water at the bottom to steam everything. But yeah people still sterilize baby bottles.

Another option with baby bottles is to buy an insert (to hold the parts) and then just put them in the dishwasher (w/ or without other dishes) and make sure to turn on the "steam sanitize" setting. Most modern dishwashers have this feature.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by chunkyfrog on Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:27 am

My kids were both bottle babies--(back before breastfeeding was considered 'primitive')
Anyhow, I started out boiling their bottles and nipples (they were latex, then)
I stopped when I accidentally boiled the pot dry (probably had apnea then)
Do people sterilize baby stuff now?--the nipples are silicone--like our interface parts.
I might consider using the steamer, but it didn't work that well on edamame.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by srodeman8 on Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:19 am

Hi, the best thing to do is to get the water to boiling, then turn it off for a minute and then put in nasal pillows and leave in there for an hour or so, then shake to get all the remaining water out in the bathtub, and then dry out. Be sure it is COMPLETELY dry before using again. A blow dryer may be used. Don't boil, but do the next best thing. The tubing does change a bit, but is still usable - that's up to you, but the nasal pillows are fine. I do this when I start to get a nasal drip problem which happens periodically. I have found that the nasal drip goes away if I do this in conjunction with turning on the humidifier to 3 with less than an inch of water inside. I have a supply of nasal pillows and switch to a clean on each day.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by ozze_dollar on Fri Jan 20, 2012 7:16 pm

squid13 wrote:I've boiled my older Swift FX pillows with no problem to them, in fact I've been using them again. Seems to give them new life.


Well,there you go!

Re: boiling stuff

Post by squid13 on Fri Jan 20, 2012 5:18 pm

I've boiled my older Swift FX pillows with no problem to them, in fact I've been using them again. Seems to give them new life.

Re: boiling stuff

Post by ozze_dollar on Fri Jan 20, 2012 5:14 pm

I cant imagine boiling the cushion or pillows. I just wash while I am in the shower every moring with a pure soap and warm water then rinse.I think my cushions last longer than average.

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